A patent has been granted to a global consortium of research establishments including the University of Arkansas, it holds the promise of unlocking the secrets of returning a hair loss sufferer to a full head of hair.  Though you might need to be patient.

BMD 2341


As exotic names go it is rather understated isn’t it?  This though is the name of the pharmaceutical protein which has earned the patent. It has been developed from another protein the same team produced and patented back in 2013, under something called a “composition of matter” patent. The original protein was aimed at treating osteoporosis, but they noticed the reaction of mice in trials and further developed BMD-2341 to treat hair loss. Now don’t get too excited but one of the Arkansas scientists, Joshua Sakon, said that “it had an effect in suppressing or reversing hair loss”.

How Effective Is It?


Unfortunately this won’t be known for a while yet so the jury is out. So far they have managed to get mice to sprout a few new follicles and now hope to move on to human trials, which will take a long time to turn into a product of any sort. For now we will need to cross our fingers that it isn’t simply another addition to the end of the market that already exists, with their sometimes modest benefits. But just imagine if it were a miracle cure that let you sprout hair from every follicle again, with reduced rest phases so it was never thicker.

What Happens Next?

way forward

BMD2341 is in good hands. The University of Arkansas is rated as one of the top 2% of American research facilities and is the home of Biologics MD – who own the exclusive licence to exploit both patents. They have promised a line of protein therapeutics and drug/device combination products aimed at treating hair loss and baldness.

Should I Buy A Comb?

teddy boy

Not just yet unfortunately, those human trials mentioned previously can take a very long time, and they haven’t even started yet. It is not a shampoo or cream. It is in the remit of the trial to last long enough to pick up problems that might be slow to appear. There is a significant danger they will never get past those trials. Or that the efficacy has a low success rate among patients, or that those that do show improvement show only a modest one. But while the glimmer of hope remains…

Hopefully, in years to come, we will get to report that Professor Sakon is relaxing with his Nobel Prize and enjoying the ridiculous luxury of the life of the man who beat hair loss.

Here’s hoping.



By Ian Watson


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