hair transplant myths uncoveredHair transplants have become increasingly popular for men worried about their ever-thinning locks. Celebrities such as Wayne Rooney have shown just how successful transplants can be. However, there are a lot of myths out there surrounding the procedure so before deciding if it’s right for you, it helps to ensure you have all the facts. Here you’ll discover the truth behind the most common hair transplant myths.

It’s the only solution out there

There are many causes of hair loss and therefore many different types of treatments available. Hair transplants may be one of the few permanent solutions, but they certainly aren’t your only option. SMP is another long-term treatment option which can actually have much better results, isn’t as expensive and can be used to cover up a wider range of balding issues.

A transplant gives you a full head of hair

This myth ends up causing a lot of disappointment for men who undergo the procedure. Total hair restoration is never advised due to the likelihood of achieving very unnatural looking results. The amount of hair that can be restored will depend upon numerous factors, including how much healthy hair is available to act as a donor for the transplant. If you opted for SMP treatment however, no donor hairs are required and it can be used either as a cover up for thinning patches, or to create a fully shaved style for those who have gone almost completely bald.

They only help those who are completely bald

Hair transplants actually cannot be performed unless there is still some healthy hair on the scalp to use as donor hairs. So, if you’re completely bald a transplant isn’t recommended. However, hair transplants should also be avoided during the early stages of male pattern baldness. This is because as the hair continues to thin and fall out, the hairline could end up receding past the point where donor follicles were transplanted – resulting in a very odd look. Overall, hair transplants can be successful and effective, but they aren’t the only option out there. You might want to consider SMP instead. Compared to transplants, SMP can be successfully used on a broader range of patients, is 100% successful and it is a lot less expensive.

SHARE STORY

AUTHOR

By Ian Watson

RELATED

Free Consultation