IT, hypertension and hair lossA recent study has revealed some very interesting facts surrounding hair loss experienced by IT professionals. Carried out by the Bangalore Hairline International Research & Treatment Centre, the study followed 1000 patients from August 2014 to July 2016. Of those surveyed, 75% worked within the IT sector, were aged between 25-35 and led a somewhat sedentary life.

Proving a link between hypertension and hair loss

The results of the study highlight a definite link between hypertension and hair loss. They are hoping this recent evidence will help with the development of new effective treatments. Those who were found to suffer with androgenetic alopecia typically experienced high levels of stress. This placed them at a predisposition to go on to develop hypertension. So, the conclusion of the study was that those who presented with androgenetic alopecia were at a higher risk of hypertension at a young age.

Not the first time hypertension has been linked to hair loss

The recent study isn’t the first to suggest a link between hypertension and hair loss. In 2013 it was reported that a Japanese study had revealed patients who suffer with hair loss on the crown of their head were 52% more likely to develop coronary heart disease. Worse news came for men suffering from both hair loss on the crown and a receding hairline, known as vertex baldness, whose chances of developing heart disease increased to 69%. The cause of the problem is said to be DHT levels. DHT, or Dihydrotestosterone, is a well-known cause of hair loss. The chemical is actually needed by the body, but in excessive levels it does have harmful effects. Causing the hair follicles to shrink, high DHT levels lead to thinning of the hair. Another potential link is that increased hormone levels can cause the artery walls to thicken, reducing blood supply and eventually leading to the death of the follicles. Overall, experts are keen to highlight that baldness isn’t a cause of heart disease, but it could potentially be a symptom. Those working within a high-stress environment such as IT professionals, generally increase the risk of increased DHT, leading to early baldness and hypertension.

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By Ian Watson

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