Sphinganine: A hair loss ingredient to watch?Another month, another new miracle cure for hair loss – and the ingredient that’s currently waking waves is a compound known as Sphinganine.

Already successfully tested on the skin of pigs, the main selling point of Sphinganine appears to be its ability to prevent the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, the main culprit when it comes to male pattern baldness. And it’s also been claimed to act as a topical remedy for poor scalp heath and hair quality.

Get a rush of blood to the head

Great news if you’re a pig who wants a lustrous tumbling mane – but is it going to work on bipeds like us? Rekze Laboratories seem to think so: they’ve launched a range of products containing Sphinganine, including a shampoo and wipes.

As well as giving your head a boost of Sphinganine, they’re also geared towards boosting the circulation of blood to the scalp, which is key to fending off further hair loss.

But do these products actually work?

Whenever a new product or ingredient comes onto the market, there’s invariably a mass outbreak of anticipation, followed in the most park by a feeling of disappointment.

No, there isn’t a miracle cure for hair loss – but in their defence, most of these products are far better for your hair than your typical off-the-shelf haircare product.

For example, most of the cheaper shampoos available in your local supermarket are loaded with Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate – low-cost detergents in shampoos and cleansers that are linked to skin irritation, drying, and hair loss due to the damage they can do to follicles.

The bottom line: most new hair-loss compounds can definitely prevent further damage and loss to your hair, but they can’t bring it back.

So if you’re tired of forking out for high-end goop, maybe it’s time to bite the bullet and consider a little help from an aesthetic clinic.



By Ian Watson


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