Childhood hair loss is not particularly common, but it can be severe and its effects extremely distressing for both child and parents.

When a child starts to lose their hair the most common diagnosis is alopecia areata, usually evidenced by hair loss in small round patches. Over time these patches can go away but often they move position, become larger and more aggressive in nature. Sometimes what starts as alopecia areata can develop into total loss of all head hair, a condition known as alopecia totalis.

What treatments are available?

Assuming that one of the common forms of alopecia is the cause of the hair shedding, unfortunately there are very few options available to reverse the condition. A visit to the doctor can often result in the administering of topical steriods or steriod injections into the affected area, and although this option does work well for some children, for many it does not. We do offer MHT scalp micropigmentation treatments to children who have the consent of their parents or guardians, however whether or not we would agree to offer such a treatment would depend on many factors including the duration of the condition, the extent of hair loss and the age and mental state of the child. We always act in the best interest of the child, and we therefore reserve the right to refuse treatment when we feel it is necessary. Scott (below) is an example of a child we have treated recently. We will be publishing his 'after' video soon.

Other possible causes

Although alopecia is often to blame, there are other conditions that may be causing your child to lose their hair. These include strong medications including cancer treatment, a fungal infection of the scalp known as tinea capitis or severe emotional stress possibly caused by a recent event, bereavement or upheaval of a childs circumstances. Finally, there is a condition called Trichotillomania which is an emotional disorder that compells a child to pull at their hair.

SHARE STORY

AUTHOR

By Damien

RELATED

Free Consultation