Europe’s largest Cancer conference takes place in Vienna towards the end of this month. Paxman, the pioneers of scalp cooling, will be unveiling their commitment to achieve zero hair loss during chemotherapy. What is behind this statement? Is it a realistic ambition or just a marketing gimmick? We investigate.



Paxman Scalp Cooling


Image result for paxman scalp cooling
Paxman scalp cooling equipment has been used on over 100,000 patients in 32 different countries, helping them prevent hair loss and improve their self-confidence through the tough treatment regime of chemotherapy. The treatment involves cooling the scalp before, during and after chemotherapy.


80% By 2020




Confidence in their prediction to achieve zero hair loss in chemotherapy doesn’t just come from that successful history however. Their commitment to R&D is quite breathtaking in its scope and scale.

Paxman are working closely with the oncologists and scientists responsible for delivering todays treatments. By collating their results alongside feedback from the patients themselves, they are able to drive best practice and maximize results, with the medium term target to raise the success rate for zero hair loss from its current 50% to a targeted 80% by 2020.


The Path To Zero Hair Loss




At the heart of their plans for zero loss is an international multi-disciplinary group to specifically explore chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) and scalp cooling. They are tasked with gaining a deeper understanding of the precise mechanisms of scalp cooling and the impact of the various chemotherapy regimens.
As well as this patient focussed research, Paxman is also undertaking a series of clinical trials in the UK, the US, Japan, Australia, Germany and Austria and is also developing a third-generation of the cooling cap to ensure it fits people’s heads more efficiently.
For all these reasons, but not least because we sincerely want them to succeed, the future looks bright for Paxman. Along with the development of their third iteration of the equipment they would appear to be in great shape. We wish them well.
Let’s leave the last word with Richard Paxman (MD) who says, “We are committed to ensuring that everyone undergoing chemotherapy treatment keeps their hair and will not stop until we achieve zero hair loss.”
You can read the original article, published in News Medical by clicking here



By Ian Watson


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