father christmas hair lossYou may have noticed over the last few weeks that you are losing more hair than usual, although there are many possible causes of hair fall have you ever considered the impact Christmas has on your hairline? Christmas is a stressful period of the year for many adults; it’s full of late night shopping, preparations for get-togethers, finishing work in time for the end of the year and plenty of over-eating and partying. Each of these aspects can actually take a toll on your overall health and can reflect in your hair.

Causes Of Hair Loss During The Christmas Period

Usually hair grows in a cycle and at any given time; twenty percent of hair follicles are in a resting phase. This resting phase is known as telogen and the resting follicles actually shed their hair strands, normally up to one hundred hairs a day. However as the rest of the hair follicles grown normally, there is no appearance of any bald patches. Telogen effluvium is a form of patchy hair loss which is known to be related to high stress levels. Symptoms do not actually appear until three months after the period of stress is over.  People who are affected by telogen effluvium will lose more hair than usual as their hair follicles end up entering the telogen phase prematurely. Hair loss as a result of telogen effluvium is temporary and normal hair growth continues as usual once the shedding is complete. Patients who end up experiencing a significant amount of hair loss are advised to seek professional help and to avoid their stressors which can aggravate the condition.

Traction Alopecia?

Other causes of hair loss around the Christmas period include traction alopecia due to over styling during parties and get-togethers. Traction alopecia is when there is too much stress placed on hair follicles, primarily from a pulling force being applied to the hair. This condition commonly results in men and women who style their hair and wear it in a tight ponytail or wear extensions. Hair loss occurs gradually however can be permanent if not treated early on.

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By Ian Watson

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